Welcome to Talking ‘Bout My Generation: How the Formative Years of The Baby Boomer Experience (1945 to 1985) Changed America and Continue to Influence Our Nation Today

Hello. My name is Dave Price and I’m the creator, curator, and chief content producer for Talking ‘Bout My Generation, a project which deals with some of the most important events, people, ideas, and topics from the first 40 years of the Baby Boomer Experience that changed, helped shape, and continue to influence the America we live in today.

History tells us the Baby Boomers are the large generation born between 1946 (the 1st year after World War II) to 1964 (the year the Beatles came to America). However, for the purposes of Talking ‘Bout My Generation, I have changed the initial year of the Baby Boomer Experience to 1945 (the year the dropping of the first atomic bombs in history on Japan ended World War II and sent American home to father all these babies) and extended the ending date of the formative years to 1985, the year the last of the Baby Boomers turned 21 and Ronald Reagan began a 2nd term as President of the United States

Since I Was born in 1952, I have been around to personally witness all but the first 6 years of Baby Boom times. When I retired from the 9-to-5 work world in 2017, I decided to use the skills I had developed in my 12 years in journalism, 20 years in high school English teaching, 5 years as as teacher trainer and instructional coach for the Talent Development Program of Johns Hopkins, and 4 years as a DC-based national educational consultant to create and operate the project. (And yes, for those of you who know your rock music, I did steal the title from the 1965 British Invasion single by Pete Townshend and The Who).

During our first 4 years, highlights included the researching, writing, and publishing of my 1st book Come Together: How the Baby Boomers, the Beatles, and a Youth Counterculture Combined to Create the Music of the Woodstock Generation. (And yes, I did steal that title from the Beatles 1969 single – I’m sure you see a pattern developing here). I also guided Baby-Boom-themed tours at the former museum of news the Newseum on Pennsylvania Avenue, designed and delivered a walking tour on famous DC protests for Smithsonian Associates, and presented a series of interactive lectures at the Smithsonian and other DC venues.

In 2022, due in large part to the effects of the Corona Virus Pandemic, we reviewed, revised, and revamped our goals and plans. Currently, we focus on 4 projects. They are:

  • The Come Together Series: 11 Interactive, Multi-Media Presentations on 50s & 60s Rock & Roll Available for Groups In-Person or On-Line
  • We’re Not Going to Take It: 60s/70s Style Political & Social Activism – As It Was Then & As It Is Now


I believe there is much here for you to enjoy whether you are a Baby Boomer, or someone from a younger generation who wants to learn more how the past is directly influencing all our lives today. If you do like what we’re offering, please subscribe to the email link above so you can get regular updates on what’s new and what’s news at Talking ‘Bout My Generation: The Baby Boomer Experience.

Our Talks/Lectures/Presentations Available for Any Group, Organization, or Venue

Talks from my book Come Together

Whole Lot of Shakin’ Goin’ On: How Did Rock and Roll Come to Be?

  • 12 Changes That Paved the Way for the Rock and Roll of the 50s
  • What Was the 1st Rock and Roll Record?
  • Rockin’ ‘Round the Clock: DJ Alan Freed, the combo band Bill Haley and His Comets, and the movie Blackboard Jungle ignite a rock and roll explosion

Setting the Stage for the Beatles

  • The King and Court: Elvis and 6 other rock and roll pioneers who greatly influenced the Beatles
  • A New Frontier: The music of the Kennedy years (1960 to 1963)

From Rock and Roll to Rock: A 6-year musical road trip from Liverpool to Woodstock

  • 1964 – The Beatles and the Music of the British Invasion
  • 1965 – With Rubber Soul, The Beatles, Under the Influence of Bob Dylan and Pot, Create Song Lyrics with More Mature Meanings
  • 1966 – Garage Rock Rules, but Albums like the Beatles’ Revolver Begin Making LPs More Important Than 45 Singles
  • 1967 – With the Beatles Sgt. Pepper’s as Its Soundtrack, a Summer of Love Gives Birth to Psychedelic Rock and the Hippie Lifestyle
  • 1968 – The Music of the Beatles, the Stones, and Others Reflect Turbulent Times
  • 1969 – The Beatles Stay Home But from Atlantic Pop to Woodstock to the Isle of Wright to Altamont, It’s a Year of the Big Music Festival
  • from Our Rock and Pop Culture Division – Rock of Agers Icons

Rock Icons and the Real World Series

The Bands

  • Here, There, and Everywhere: How the World Would Be Much Different Without the Influences of the Beatles
  • What a Drag It Is Getting Old: What the Rolling Stones Can Teach All of Us About Aging
  • A Traveling Show of Deadheads and Tie-Dye: The Radical, Yet Highly Successful Business Plan of the Grateful Dead

Individual Artists

  • The Answer Is Blowin’ in the Wind: The Great Protest Anthems of Bob Dylan
  • Is a Dream a Lie If It Don’t Come True or Is It Something Worse: Bruce Springsteen and the Unfilled Promise of the American Dream
  • Rebel, Rebel: David Bowie Drives GlamRock, Androgyny, and Gay Life Style

45 Revolutions a Minute: Singing Out for Social Change 

  • Just Show Me Some Respect: Songs Celebrating Gender Equality & Female Freedom 
  • Keep on Pushin’: The Greatest Songs of the Civil Rights Movement
  • Say It Loud, I’m Black and I’m Proud: The Songs of Black Pride and Power
  • We Gotta Get Out of This Place: Anti-Vietnam War Songs & Peace Classics
  • Smile on Your Brother: Songs Calling for Peace, Love, & Understanding
  • Look at Mother Nature on the Run Since the 1970s: Songs to Save Our Earth

Roy Lichtenstein: The Art World’s Prince of Pop

This article 1st appeared in The Prices Do DC – December 23, 2012

In 1961, at the urging of a fellow Rutgers University art professor, Roy Lichtenstein loaded up a station wagon with a few pieces of his new art work, and, accompanied by his colleague, headed across the river to New York to try to convince an influential gallery owner that his work should be exhibited. Among those paintings was “Look Mickey, 1961.” On a first look, the gallery owner was impressed and Lichtenstein was on his way to sharing billing with Andy Warhol as the 2 most noted artists in the school of visual creation that came to be known as Pop Art.

But as art historian Avis Berman points out, Lichtenstein was no overnight sensation. “His life was divided into 2 roughly symmetrical halves: 38 years of obscurity and 36 years of permanent fame,” Berman says. “He hung in and hung on.”

Berman’s remarks came during a lecture entitled Roy Lichtenstein: Voices from the Archive she recently delivered at the National Gallery of Art as part of that institution’s major retrospective of Lichtenstein’s work now on display.

As consultant for the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation, Berman has conducted more than 200 interviews with the artist, his family, and those who knew him. One of the most unusual aspects of her talk was that it was punctuated more than a dozen times by the actual words recorded from Lichtenstein himself. “Call it an art historian’s version of a Tony Bennett duet,” Berman joked before she began her talk.

Berman said Lichtenstein, best known for his trademark use of benday dots that he used to create works lifted from cartoons and comic strips, was constantly intrigued by the question – what is art? As Lichtenstein put it, “I was always baffled by why are these few marks art and these few marks are not art? Why is one valued and the other one isn’t?”

On Pop art, Lichtenstein said, “Part of the intention on Pop is to mask its intentions with humor. But Pop should also tell you something you didn’t know.”

Berman said the oral interviews have greatly expanded the understanding of both Lichtenstein and his work. “He had no impulse to accumulate documentation and he lived in a time when the telephone was replacing the letter as the means of communication,” she noted. “The more we can understand the background of an artist the more easy it is to understand the art.”

For example, her interviews revealed that despite his fame, Lichtenstein was extremely generous. “He gave anyone who did something nice for him or anyone who worked for him some of his art work,” Berman said.

Much of Lichtenstein’s reputation rests on the fact that he upended virtually every prejudice of high art that existed at the time he began his Pop work. However, Lichtenstein admitted that his breakthrough was really unplanned. “My ability was way above my awareness. The rationales came later. I guess anyone can become a crazed genius for a second,” he joked during one of his interviews.”

Lichtenstein definitely believed that all art isn’t really new, but is based on the art of the past. “It takes a lot of generations of artists looking at other artists to produce new art,” he said.

Berman said she doesn’t agree with the contention that Lichtenstein was simply aping work others had originally created. “He didn’t just copy. He changed and strengthened the original completely. He looked at what had been overlooked,” she said.

The art historian maintains that Lichtenstein and Warhol will remain significant figures in the history of art. “Pop was denigrated but it has come to be recognized as a legitimate school of art. It captured the zeitgeist of the 1960s,” she contended.

Tales, Tidbits, and Tips

Taking the Stand to Make a Stand

This article 1st appeared in The Prices Do DC – 10.01.11

It is one of the most dramatic, revolutionary pictures of all-time. Two young black men, just moments removed from winning track medals in the 1968 Olympics, standing on the medal-platform, heads down, a single back-gloved fist raised in the air in silent protest.

And tonight, 43 years later, John Carlos, one of those historic figures, appeared at the Busboys and Poets bookstore along with sports writer Dave Zirin,to discuss the book The John Carlos Story they had co-written.

In a lengthy, highly entertaining, often hilarious monologue, Carlos detailed his life which led him from the streets of Harlem to his historic moment in Mexico. Initially, he said, there has been much discussion of a boycott of the 1968 games by black American athletes to protest conditions for blacks here and in white-dominated African countries.

That boycott was to receive full support from Civil Rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.  In fact, Carlos said he had a chance to meet with King, who was then embroiled in a trashmen’s dispute in Memphis, and asked him why, with death threats escalating, he continued his crusade.

Carlos said Dr. King very simply told him: “John, I have to go back to stand for those who won’t stand 
for themselves and I have to go back to stand for those who can’t stand for themselves.”

Within months, Dr. King was assassinated and the boycott idea was dead. However, Carlos and his running mate Tommie Smith vowed to take some kind of a stand. And so, when Smith finished 1st and Carlos 3rd in the 200, an eternal visual symbol of protest came to be.

Interestingly, while all the focus was on the gloved raised fists, there were other aspects of the protest. Both athletes wore necklaces for lynchings of blacks in the South and  stepped up to the podium without shoes to call attention to the plight of the poor. Carlos further left his track suit unzipped in a sign of solidarity with oppressed workers.

Zirin, who is one of the most socially conscious sports writers in America today, said he had 2 major questions when he and Carlos started the book.  The first was – why did you risk what you did? (and indeed the  fallout was nasty and long-lasting).  Zirin indicated that perhaps the answer to that could best be explained in a quote on the front cover of the book:”How can you ask someone to live in the world and not have something to say about injustice?”

The second, and perhaps even more important question, Zirin said is – why does what Carlos did still seem to matter so much and resonate so loudly? “We still have injustice today and it’s still important for people to take a stand. John did that. And he paid for his stand, but he says he really had no other choice – it was the right thing to do,” Zirin said.

Andy Warhol: Flash and Shadows

This article 1st appeared in The Prices Do DC – 12.03.2011

Pop artist Andy Warhol exhibited a life-long interest in news and news makers, a fascination that was reflected in much of his art over 3 decades. Whether it was small black and white pictures of news boxes or giant Warholian replicas of actual tabloid headlines, the daily news often served both as source and inspiration for the New-York based artist.

Today, we headed to the National Gallery of Art to view the exhibit Warhol: Headlines. Work there ranged from one of his first large prints of news tabloid material “A Boy for Meg” (1961) to his last 1980s TV shows for MTV Andy Warhol’s 15 Minutes of Fame.

To me, the most captivating piece was a large work entitled “News Flash.” which transposed enlarged actual news flashes from those historic 3 November days in Dallas in 1963 when President John Kennedy was assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald, who, in turn, was gunned down by Jack Ruby as a stunned audience watched on national TV with screen shot prints of Kennedy and his wife, Jackie, in the colorful Warhol style.

It was the news and the handling of the same that moved Warhol to create the piece more than paying any tribute to the slain president. “I was thrilled having Kennedy as president. He was handsome, young, smart – but it doesn’t bother me much that he is dead.” Warhol once said. “What bothers me was the way television and radio was programming everybody to feel so sad. It seemed like no matter how hard you tried, you couldn’t get away from the thing.”

Ironically, in 1968, Warhol had his own brush with assassination and Kennedy death.  Hanger-on Valerie Solonas asttacked Warhol, firing point blank at him with a pistol. Coming back from the edge of death in the hospital Warhol said “I heard a television going somewhere and the words ‘Kennedy’ and ‘assassin’ and ‘shot’ over and over again. Robert Kennedy had been shot, but what was so weird was that I had no understanding that this was a second Kennedy assassination. I just thought that maybe after you die, they rerun things for you, like President Kennedy’s assassination.”

To complete our DC day with Warhol we crossed the National Mall to the Hirshhorn Gallery of Modern Art to take in the companion show Andy Warhol Shadows, which features a pattern of  a 100 large canvases with streaks and trails created by painting with a mop.

When Warhol himself hung that exhibit in New York in 1979 he said, “Someone asked me if I thought they were art and I said no. You see the opening party has disco and I guess that makes them disco decor.”

“The show will not be liked like all the others. The reviews will be bad – my reviews always are. But the review of the party will be terrific,” Warhol concluded.

Tales, Tips, and Traveling Tips
Both Warhol exhibits are temporary and will be gone from DC by mid January. However, if you have an interest in Warhol, his works, pop art, or the 60s, you can always visit the Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, the city of his birth. We’ve been there and the trip is worth it.

The Best of Sports: It’s Just a Click Away

This post 1st appeared in The Prices Do DC – 12.10.2011

He’s been called “the Mozart of sports photographers.” His photos made the front cover of more than 170 issues of Sports Illustrated. His shot of Muhammad Ali (then known as Cassius Clay) standing in triumph over a fallen Sonny Liston is considered the greatest sports photo of the 20th Century.

Neil Leifer, whose photos make up the visually arresting Photo Finish: The Sports Photography of Neils Leifer now on display at the Newseum, described his 5 decades as a premier picture taker during today’s latest edition of the interactive museum’s Inside Media program.

During his hour-long presentation, moderated by long-time journalist Shelby Coffee, the amiable Leifer detailed his belief that his amazing success is a combination of skill, determination, preparation, and perhaps most of all, some incredible luck.

As a teenager, Leifer said he knew exactly what he wanted to do with his life. He wanted to combine his passion for sports with his love of photography. “Besides, I knew it would let me have the best seat in the house which I never would have been able to afford,” Leifer said.

In 1958, pluck and ingenuity propelled Leifer toward his desired career. He would arrive early at Yankee Stadium for New York Giants football games and volunteer to wheel in disabled veterans. “There were 50 or 60 veterans and only 6 or 7 people to push the wheelchairs. Once we got them in, we could watch the game,” Leifer said. He explained that he would bring hot coffee to shivering police officers who would “look the other way” while Leifer would pull his cheap camera out from under his coat and shoot some pictures from the bench or the end zone. It was this arrangment that allowed him to capture his first great shot: Johnny Unitas scoring the winning touchdown in what is still called the greatest professional football game ever played. “I learned that day that 75 percent of great sports photography is luck and the rest is getting the shot,” Leifer explained.

Leifer readily admits that boxing is his favorite sport, with the incomparable Ali his favorite subject of all-time. Leifer captured Ali in more than 70 different photo sessions, some staged and some acted out on canvas. “Ali was God’s gift to every journalist and photographer. He made everything you did that much better,” he said.

Not surprisingly, Leifer calls Ali that greatest athlete he ever photographed. Numbers 2 and 3 aren’t as obvious, however. He lists triple-crown winner Secretariat as second. In 3rd place, he claims it is American Olympic skater Eric Heiden. “He raced in all 5 speed skating races, won all 5, and set 4 records,” Leifer said. “I think that may be the most incredible sports performance of all-time.”

And what, after the millions of photos he has taken, is his favorite? Leifer says that answer is easy – it is the 1966 picture of Ali walking back to his corner in the Houston Astrodome after kocking out his challenger. “That picture … there isn’t a thing I would change,” Leifer said. “It’s the only one of my pictures I have hanging in my house.”

While Leifer is most known for his collection of sports shots, he has scored with some non-sports pictures, too. One of his favorite photos came after he convinced Cuban dictator Fidel Castro to light his cigar and then have a shot of both of them smoking away.  Leifer captured a Time magazine cover with his shot of Pope John Paul. And then there is the rare  picture of a hat-wearing President John Kennedy at the opening day of the 1961 baseball season at Washington’s Griffith Stadium. Leifer explained how he captured that picture. As was then custom, Kennedy,  as president was called upon to throw out the first pitch. “Let’s just say he had a lousy delivery.  I knew I didn’t have a picture there,” Leifer said. So, for the next 8 innings, he sat with his back to the game, waiting for a worthwhile shot of JFK. “I was hoping he would eat a hot dog and get some mustard on his chin, but he wasn’t really doing anything,” Leifer said. Suddenly, it became colder and Kennedy did something he never did – he placed a hat on his head. Then, Leifer was once again the recipient of great luck. A high foul ball headed toward the Presidential box, Kennedy turned, Leifer clicked, and another award-winning photo was captured. “I always say this is the picture of the Kennedy administration leaning left. Caroline Kennedy once told me that (picture) was the only time she had ever seen her Dad with a hat on,” Leifer said.

During the audience question-and-answer session, Leiffer was asked if there were any shots he regretted not capturing.  “Of course,” he responded. “You’re paid not to miss, but you do. Sometimes it comes down to being in the right seat. There’s skill involved, but as I say, there’s a lot of luck, too.”

Coffee said Leifer is an extreme rarity in the sports world, a non-athlete who is considered as famous as the subjects he is covering. “I’ve been with Neil at an event and it’s sort of like being backstage with Bono at a U2 concert.  John McEnroe comes to Neil’s table to greet him,” Coffee explained.