Am I the Only One Using Bar Soap? Well Maybe Then I Am Getting Old

They told me one day I would feel old, but I just refused to believe them. Age 30. Then 40, 50, 60, now 68. Nope, not old. Grey hair. White hair. Thinning hair. Definitely more hair in my ears and my nose than on the growing bald spot on the back of my head. Still didn’t feel old. Besides, wild ear and nose hair … that’s what small scissors are for.

An expanding stomach. Creaking bones. Getting up at night to pee. Still no significant difference. Hey, I thought, maybe I’m impervious to aging and its supposed incapacitating side effects.

The Decline of the Humble Bar of Soap

But all that changed recently. I had to face the fact that maybe I really am old. What happened, you ask? Well, I still use bar soap. And, according to research from the market firm Mintel, younger adults think a dispenser of liquid soap is easier to use, less messy with no slimy soap dish to clean, and more hygienic. Not only are they thinking that, they’re showing their anti-soap-bar feelings as consumers.

Bar soap sales were down 2.2 percent from 2014 to 2015, even though overall sales for soap, bath and shower products increased by nearly 3 percent during the same period. Usage of bar soap is also slipping and sliding, with the percentage of households using the traditional bar dropping from 89 percent to 84 percent between 2010 and 2015.

Generational and Gender Findings are Clear

It turns out that older men made up the only group clinging to their bars of soap. Women and younger body washers of both sexes were abandoning their old bars for new fancy plastic bottles of liquid soap.

The study reported that while 60 percent of those age 65 plus were happy to keep using bar soap to wash their face, hands, and other body parts, just 33 percent of those ages 25 to 34 were still grabbing the bar.

It also showed that men are also more willing to use bar soap than women. The survey found that 53 percent of men were willing to wash their face with bar soap, compared with 36 percent of women.

I first heard the findings on a my car stereo. Shaken, I rushed home to my apartment to check out their veracity on my computer. The internet did supply more detail. For example, the younger people were using the liquid soap because they were convinced that it had fewer germs in it. But soon I found a buried paragraph that showed I didn’t really have to abandon my green Irish Spring Soap – the only soap for really virile, really manly men.

An epidemiologist told The Huffington Post that while germs likely do live in the damp “slime” of bar soap, they’re unlikely to make you sick. And, since one of my former students Kate Sheppard is an editor there, I know the HP would never print a falsehood. And, my new favorite scientist added, rinsing the soap under running water before lathering with it should solve any problems.

Immediately, my aging fears melted like a tiny bar of my beloved Irish Spring left too long in a running shower. Not only was I not old, I was still smarter than those young whippersnappers with their dubious soap safety claims. Exclusive liquid soap use was simply like arranged playdates and bone-marrow appetizers so popular with Millennials today. So let the young have their ways. But for us Boomers, we’re not going too take it. I’m not going to let the youngsters pry my beloved bar of Irish Spring soap from my cold, wrinkly, but immaculately clean fingers

You’re Not Over the Hill Until You Start Believing You’re Over the Hill

How old is really old?Apparently, the answer depends on the age of the person responding to the question.Intuitively, this makes sense. Take a moment and think back to when you were 15. How did you view a person who was 20? Now return to your current mindset. How do you view a person who is 5 years older than you today?

Well we now have research data to support the concept that age is relative. The AARP recently conducted a survey on different generations’ views on aging and what exactly constitutes being old.

When Are You “Over the Hill?”

Possibly the most interesting generational finding came from the question that asks what age is “over the hill?” Millennials born between 1981 to 2000 consider 56 is old. Gen X born 1965 to 1980 say 62 and Baby Boomers, born 1946 to 1964, say that age 75 is officially when you are “over the hill.”

Don’t Forget This Finding

Traditionally, forgetfulness has been associated with aging. But the AARP study found that Millennials claim to forget things daily by 5 percent more than those reporting from the other 2 generations. Perhaps this is due to their hectic, fast-paced lives.

However, the 3 generations have a differing term for labeling exactly why they forget. Millennials call it forgetfulness or memory lapse. Gen Xers say they are having a brain freeze or brain overload. Baby Boomers report experiencing a senior moment.

What About Age Stereotypes?

Approximately 30 percent of those surveyed admitted to having made assumptions about people based solely on their age.

When it came to describing aging stereotypes, the most common generalizations focused on an older person’s poor driving ability, physical slowness, and stubborn view on things.

Younger people were most often accused of being too dependent on modern technology, appearing self-centered, and wanting everything immediately without earning it.

Despite beliefs to the contrary, for the most part, all age groups didn’t see themselves treated inappropriately or disrespectfully based on their age.

Interestingly the youngest respondents felt most victimized by age discrimination. The breakdown for experiencing perceived inappropriate treatment were Millennials, 17%; GenXers, 7%; and Baby Boomers, 13%.

How Are We All the Same Regardless of Age?

In the research, there were several beliefs and priorities that all the generational respondents agreed on. This included continuing to learn new skills regularly and feeling that aging is about living, not dying. All ages agreed that both experience and wisdom come with age.

They all claimed that the biggest limitations due to aging centered around physical abilities, fashion choices, and the ability to find a job. Thinking people are more likely to lie about their weight or their income than age.

Finally, There is That Great Equalizer

Not surprisingly, that would be sex.

While respondents in all age groups claimed they were engaging in sex several times a month, the vast majority would prefer to have it more often than they were.

Guess it all just goes to show that there is equality when it comes to what happens behind closed doors and drawn curtains. No matter what age we are, when it comes to sex, we’re more alike than we are different. Or at least that’s what we want people to think.

You’re Never Too Old to Protest, But Sometimes You Discover the Street Isn’t the Best Place for You to Do That

Photo by Bruce Guthrie

I began my political activism – or, translating that into the parlance of today became woke – in 1968 in my then-conservative hometown of Bridgeton in rural southern New Jersey. One year later, I not only continued that local activism, but expanded my protesting to include the Villanova University campus where I was enrolled as a college student and, periodically through the year and the early years of the decade to follow, at various sites in Washington, DC.

The act of protesting itself and contact with my fellow protesters, most of whom were then older, taught me much about life. For example, it was in the nation’s capital where I was first tear gassed. And where I was first maced. I was spit on and pushed by counter protesters and chased by law enforcement many times. As an activist, I was arrested, harassed, and detained on occasion. I had a policeman in full riot gear place the barrel of a shotgun against the side of my neck and scream “I told you. Shut the fuck up”. I took his advice in the short term and shut up. But after being released from jail the next morning, I resumed my protesting.

From 1974 to 2011, I continued protesting injustice, but almost all of it was done in a much different way — first as a newspaper reporter and then as an educator in poverty-plagued urban school systems. When my wife and I retired, we moved to Crystal City, Virginia, which is only 3 Metro stops from Washington, DC, meaning I could again protest, rally, and march in the nation’s capital. I worked with and aided Occupy Washington. I marched for gay rights, same sex marriage, Black Lives Matter, women’s rights, and science and the environment and I marched against corporate greed, the blood-drenched NRA, and the senseless slaughter of our students in their schools. On 2 occasions, I actually had a chance to speak directly to Donald Trump outside the White House with Kremlin Annex, a group who held nightly rallies opposing the current temporary resident living at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Of course, Trump probably didn’t hear me because he was inspecting his White House bunker, watching Fox Fake News with the sound turned up, or tweeting in bed with a cheeseburger on his lap.

Today, another massive rally was scheduled for Washington, DC for many of the causes I believe in, but for the first time since we have been in the DC area, I was not participating.

There were several reasons for my decision. And in the spirit of all those radicals from the 20s and 30s who were kind enough to share their wisdom and experience with me, I would like to offer the same to the young protesters of today, who someday will find themselves old.

If I had to describe myself politically now, I would say I am an uber-liberal, a former radical now tempered by reality and age. I still realize that America faces serious threats to its survival, many of them like racism, class, and income equality carried over from our ’60s days of rage. We also now have the specter of worldwide climate change and global warming which portend the end of life as we know it. And, as the proverbial cherry on the top of this melting poisonous spoiled-ice-cream-mountain-mess of destruction, we also have a coronavirus pandemic which has already taken more than 100,000 American lives and is still with us.

All these deadly threats are compounded by the fact that we are being led (or not being led depending on your personal view) by Donald J. Trump, already identified by historians as the worst of the 45 American presidents.

The realist in me has prioritized that the one thing I can most readily change to help the future is to keep Donald Trump from achieving a second term as president. That is the main reason I chose not to take to the DC streets today. In order to continue working against Trump from now until Election Day and then casting my vote for the person I believe has the best chance of defeating him, I must be alive. As a person in the prime age for COVID0-19, I don’t think the best place for me right now is surrounded by thousands of people, making social distancing impossible.

In addition, neither protesting or the activist skills I now possess are the same as when I first began my activism in the ’60s. While huge protests still prove a point, with the 24-hour news cycle, cable TV, and ubiquitous social media, all protests, not just those in Washington, DC, now find their way onto personal screens everywhere, making the days of huge solidifying marches not as necessary to show the volume of support. In addition, as a writer who uses social media, I have more opportunity there not only to have my face seen and my body counted, but my words can reach far more people than ever before. I also appear on live shows dealing with politics and was scheduled to be on one shared on YouTube, Facebook, and Periscope at the same time I would have been at the DC rally.

But that does not mean I was comfortable staying home, no mater how much work for the cause I felt I was doing.

In a way, I guess it’s analogous to the professional athlete who has reached the end of his on-field playing career and now realizes he can best help his team by managing or coaching from the sidelines. Of course, you miss the thrill that only happens on the field, but you come to understand you can still be a crucial component of any team victory.

So for all the young protesters out there today in DC or anywhere else where I can’t be in upcoming days, here’s some advice:

  • If you are protesting for any cause that Donald Trump is opposing, don’t have second thoughts about if you are right. One of the few constants in life is that Trump is always on the wrong side of what is good.
  • Do not be discouraged for long (although there will be many times when you want to abandon the cause). Major lasting change does not happen overnight. It might not even happen in your lifetime. But if you truly believe in something, fighting for it gives your own life meaning and the fight itself should be viewed as its own reward.
  • Out in the streets today, keep in mind that you should keep using safety recommendations to avoid contacting the virus — wear a mask, try to keep a physical distance of 6 feet from any sustained personal contact, keep hydrated, etc., — and if you feel any signs of illness, immediately remove yourself from the protest and seek immediate medical attention.
  • Be sure to be vigilant and survive all encounters with law enforcement. The cause does not need more martyrs. Tragically, we have too many of them. The passion and commitment you demonstrate by participating in the street is powerful and worthy of great praise, but we need your vote in November to defeat Trump. Then we can move to the next steps to resolve the myriad of problems Trump’s abysmal four-year presidency has only exacerbated.
  • Keep in mind that any sustained action calling for systemic change requires both protesters of the school of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (peaceful, nonviolent) and those who would have followed Malcolm X (by any means necessary). There is place for everyone in a revolution.
  • Do not expect any immediate results from your protesting. Right now, we are simply calling attention to problems in such a way that they become impossible for others to ignore. If you are committed for the long haul, there will be much more to do for you and all those standing (or sitting, or kneeling, or lying on the ground) next to you now.
  • Finally, it is hard for so many of us to breathe right now. For some groups, it has been hard for their members to breathe for centuries. But just because something has been, does not mean it must always be. Change can happen. But it takes a whole lot of dedication, work, resilience, and most all of hope. Please, whatever else you do, do not give up hope. For hope, coupled with action, is always the strongest activist weapon of all.

Jane Fonda Is Proving You’re Never Too Old To Take a Stand for What You Believe In

Actress/Activist Jane Fonda is arrested on the steps of the United States Capitol (Photo by Talking ‘Bout My Generation)

For Academy-Award winning actress Jane Fonda social activism is nothing new. In the 1970s, she protested against the Vietnam War, an action that placed her on President Richard Nixon’s enemies list, drew government surveillance, and left her with the nickname “Hanoi Jane” from those who felt her activities, such as a trip to North Vietnam, were treasonous and un-American.

In fact, her mugshot, in which she raises a fist, became an iconic symbol for war dissenters and counterculture renegades of that time.

But her advocacy didn’t end there. In subsequent decades, she lent her efforts to the ongoing fights for civil, women’s, and environmental rights. She carried that activism into many of her best movie roles – the wife in the anti-war movie Coming Home, a news reporter in the nuclear plant disaster film China Syndrome, and with co-stars Dolly Parton and Lilly Tomlin, as a harassed working woman in 9 to 5. 

The money from her wildly popular Jane Fonda’s Workout video tapes in the 1980s was used to fund the leftist organization Campaign for Economic Democracy, an organization founded by her then-husband and left-wing politician Tom Hayden, a prominent ‘60s activist who wrote the Port Huron Statement for SDS (Students for a Democratic Society) and was a defendant in the infamous political trial of the Chicago 8 case stemming from the police riot marred 1968 Democratic Convention. 

Now, at age 81, Fonda is proving you’re never too old to take a strong stand for what you believe in. The actress, currently starring in the Netflix series Frankie and Grace with Tomlin, has moved temporarily to Washington, D.C. and unveiled her latest cause, Fire Drill Fridays.

Fire Drill Fridays is a three-part action aimed at forcing American leaders to take immediate action on climate change. On Thursday nights, from now until late December, Fonda is hosting a panel of experts on a Facebook program exploring various issues of climate change and suggesting actions to curb the problems. On Fridays at 11 a.m., Fonda, joined by experts and spokespersons for climate change groups, is staging a rally near the U.S. Capitol. At the conclusion of that informational session, Fonda, along with all those who choose to join her, engage in an act of civil disobedience, such as standing on the Capitol steps, which causes them to be arrested by federal police. 

At the first Fire Drill Friday on October 11, Fonda told those of us in attendance that while she has long been involved in the battle over a better, cleaner environment, the current government’s refusal to even admit the crisis is real, let alone act on it, drove her to consider more dramatic ways of getting the warning message out.

“Change is coming by design or by disaster,” Fonda told the crowd. “A green new deal that transitions off fossil fuels provides the design. “As (teenage environmental activist) Greta Thunberg says ‘our house is on fire’ and we need to act like it”.

“Our climate is in crisis. Scientists are shouting an urgent warning: we have little more than a decade to take bold, ambitious action to transition our economy off of fossil fuels and onto clean, renewable energy,” she added “We need a Green New Deal to mobilize our government and every sector of the economy to tackle the overlapping crises of climate change, inequality, and structural racism at the scale and speed our communities require”. 

At that initial rally, Fonda said she planned to enlist other of her Hollywood friends concerned about climate change to join in the protest. At the second session, Fonda’s co-star Sam Waterson was arrested. Last week, actor Ted Danson, the star of Cheers and the current show The Good Place, joined Fonda and was taken into custody by authorities.

Fonda told Booming Encore she realizes many leaders of government and business, particularly President Donald Trump, won’t be pleased with the Fire Drill Friday activism. “I can no longer stand by and let our elected officials ignore — and even worse — empower — the industries that are destroying our planet for profit,” Fonda said. “We cannot continue to stand for this”.

Fonda added that she isn’t concerned about any impact the planned three-month protest and arrests will have on her career. “I’ve been here before,” she said. “I mean, I can’t be attacked any more than I already have. So what can [Trump] do? I’ve got nothing to lose.”

(Photo by Talking ‘Bout My Generation)Fr

Serving The Best Life

Two men died yesterday. 

One had houses all over the world, consorted with the famous and powerful, claimed to be as rich as a king, and even possessed his own island.

The other lived with his mother because when he was young he promised to take care of her.

One was white; the other black and Japanese.

One was a sick, sordid user and abuser; the other a giver and an empowerer. 

One was clearly a demon and a destroyer of young women, whose acts and name will long bring vile curses to the lips of virtually all who learn about him; the other was clearly a kind, compassionate, decent down-to-earth benefactor, whose sole purpose was to take teenagers in their oft-confusing years of adolescence and help mold them into young men their families and communities could be proud of.

One’s name was Jeffrey Epstein. The other was James Breech, known to all simply as Breech.

James Breech and his mother at age 92.

Today, the internet will be filled with articles and analysis of the horrid exploits and suspicious death of Epstein. But here I would like to pass on a few words about Breech, who was one of the truly great coaches and teachers I ever had the honor of meeting. 

Breech was many things to many people. But to me, he was the greatest 2nd father my sole son Michael Price could ever have had.

There are so many stories I could recount about Jim Breech. But the one I will offer took place in our kitchen of our North Park Drive home. It was the summer of Michael’s 8th grade year. He had made the Senior League baseball all-stars as a 14-year-old. That summer Breech had also been giving Michael tennis lessons. Jim stopped by to tell Michael he had entered him in his first tennis tournament. I told Michael that he would have to make a decision — he would be entering high school that Fall and since baseball and tennis were both spring sports, he should make his decision which he wanted to play now. I was sure he would choose baseball. But Michael opted for tennis. And that seemingly-then-small decision, as Robert Frost wrote in his classic poem “The Road Not Taken” definitely “made all the difference”.

During his teenage years, Michael spent more of his waking time with Breech than he did with me. Breech imparted much tennis to Michael, but much more importantly, he imparted much knowledge about the only subject that really matters – how to live life in the best way possible.

Obviously, today I see much of me in a Michael. But I also see much of Breech in my son. Fortunately, I had a few chances to tell Breech how much I appreciated his second fathership over the years. 

Like so many others who knew him, I am saddened today for Jim’s earthly passing. But I know he will live eternally in the marvelous memories he created. For me … for Michael … for my grandchildren, Audrey and Owen, both of whom are taking up tennis. 

And I’m sure Michael will pass on to them the most important lesson James Breech ever taught him — what happens on a tennis court matters for a few moments, but how you handle yourself on the court of life is what really counts. 

In our lives, we get many chances to make choices — baseball or tennis … to strive for that which seems important or for that which truly is … whether to be an Epstein or a Breech. 

Now I might not know all that is true, but I do know this — given such a choice, refuse to follow the path set down by Epstein. Always, always, always choose to be a Breech, for that is the best of all roads to travel.